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Properties of Addition and Multiplication

Jumping into 5th grade math after so many years of reading and language arts has been hard work, but oh, so much fun! I love the daily “AH-HA” moments I see and literally hear each day. “I get it!” “Oh, yeah!” “That’s neat!” “Cool!” are now phrases I routinely hear as part of my day.  This week we focused on the properties of addition and multiplication. I started of by simply introducing the concepts (minus the distributive property which we did as a lesson on its own since it is a bit more involved), and once again, visually giving them clues on remembering each property.

I explained to them that ‘Commutative’ is when two numbers 'switch' places. I then illustrated the math problem 3 + 5, drew an arch with two arrows below, asked them to tilt their head to the left and tell me what letter that looked like. It looks like a C.yes! Commutative starts with a C.




We then went over the associative property and how this property shows up with parenthesis. The parenthesis show us which two numbers we should start with, but does it really matter when all the work will be addition or multiplication? We tried it out, and of course it did not. But how do we remember that this is known as ‘Associative Property’? Well let’s look at those letters “S” found repeated in the word aSSociative. Hmmmmm.they each look like a pair of parenthesis stacked one on top of the other. “Huh? Oh, YEAH!”


Identity What is identity? We discussed how it is who someone is. Some people try to hide their identity, for example celebrities might do so when they do not want to be recognized.  SomeTHING can also have an identity. We discussed what number we need to add to a number so it does not change its identity. They quickly revealed, zero. Hmmmm, but when I multiply by zero, the number changes to zero, so that does not work there. Oh! Multiply by 1.



We then quickly created flipbooks, and transferred our definitions and examples into them together as a class.  



The students then used these notes to fill in a chart which provided different examples of math problems. They needed to find the sum or product, then list the property illustrated. 



(These pages are part of my Properties of Addition and Multiplication product which you can find HERE.)  It was a quick way for me to make sure they were understanding the properties. Results? They certainly did.

Next week.Powers of Ten!

Your Thrifty Co-Teacher,


~Cristy

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